Discussion:
Who really owns America's Debt ...
(too old to reply)
Hägar
2011-07-30 01:13:16 UTC
Permalink
... hint: It's not China

By Tom Mucha, Global Post

Truth is elusive. But it's a good thing we have math.

Our friends at Business Insider know this, and put those two principles to
work today in

this excellent and highly informative little slideshow, made even more
timely by the

ongoing talks in Washington, D.C. aimed at staving off a U.S. debt default.

Here's the big idea:

Many people - politicians and pundits alike - prattle on that China and, to
a lesser extent Japan,

own most of America's $14.3 trillion in government debt.

But there's one little problem with that conventional wisdom: it's just not
true.

While the Chinese, Japanese and plenty of other foreigners own substantial
amounts,

it's really Americans who hold most of America 's debt.

Here's a quick and fascinating breakdown by total amount held and percentage
of total U.S. debt, according to Business Insider:

Hong Kong: $121.9 billion (0.9 percent)
Caribbean banking centers: $148.3 (1 percent)
Taiwan: $153.4 billion (1.1 percent)
Brazil: $211.4 billion (1.5 percent)
Oil exporting countries: $229.8 billion (1.6 percent)
Mutual funds: $300.5 billion (2 percent)
Commercial banks: $301.8 billion (2.1 percent)
State, local and federal retirement funds: $320.9 billion (2.2 percent)
Money market mutual funds: $337.7 billion (2.4 percent)
United Kingdom: $346.5 billion (2.4 percent)
Private pension funds: $504.7 billion (3.5 percent)
State and local governments: $506.1 billion (3.5 percent)
Japan: $912.4 billion (6.4 percent)
U.S. households: $959.4 billion (6.6 percent)
China: $1.16 trillion (8 percent)
The U.S. Treasury: $1.63 trillion (11.3 percent)
Social Security trust fund: $2.67 trillion (19 percent)
So America owes foreigners about $4.5 trillion in debt.

But America owes America $9.8 trillion. But by printing
more and more money, its worth diminshes correspondingly.
It's like drinking half a Jack Daniels bottle and then re-filling
it with a brown coke/water mixture and passing it off as the
real McCoy. It's as bad as watering down good whiskey.
Brad Guth
2011-07-30 03:48:57 UTC
Permalink
William Mook has researched into this and having already told us what we
need to know. Otherwise, essentially the next ten generations of Americans
are the ones saddled with the first, second, third and fourth mortgages to
pay off, each with an adjustable interest rate rolled into the next
refinancing that is set by outsides like China and those Rothschilds.

It's like trading in your old car for that new one, and the financing always
includes whatever losses or deficiencies related to your old ride.

http://groups.google.com/group/guth-usenet?hl=en

http://docs.google.com/View?id=ddsdxhv_0hrm5bdfj

http://bradguth.blogspot.com/

http://translate.google.com/#
Brad Guth, Brad_Guth, Brad.Guth, BradGuth, BG / “Guth Usenet”
Post by Hägar
... hint: It's not China
By Tom Mucha, Global Post
Truth is elusive. But it's a good thing we have math.
Our friends at Business Insider know this, and put those two principles to
work today in
this excellent and highly informative little slideshow, made even more
timely by the
ongoing talks in Washington, D.C. aimed at staving off a U.S. debt default.
Many people - politicians and pundits alike - prattle on that China and,
to a lesser extent Japan,
own most of America's $14.3 trillion in government debt.
But there's one little problem with that conventional wisdom: it's just
not true.
While the Chinese, Japanese and plenty of other foreigners own substantial
amounts,
it's really Americans who hold most of America 's debt.
Here's a quick and fascinating breakdown by total amount held and
Hong Kong: $121.9 billion (0.9 percent)
Caribbean banking centers: $148.3 (1 percent)
Taiwan: $153.4 billion (1.1 percent)
Brazil: $211.4 billion (1.5 percent)
Oil exporting countries: $229.8 billion (1.6 percent)
Mutual funds: $300.5 billion (2 percent)
Commercial banks: $301.8 billion (2.1 percent)
State, local and federal retirement funds: $320.9 billion (2.2 percent)
Money market mutual funds: $337.7 billion (2.4 percent)
United Kingdom: $346.5 billion (2.4 percent)
Private pension funds: $504.7 billion (3.5 percent)
State and local governments: $506.1 billion (3.5 percent)
Japan: $912.4 billion (6.4 percent)
U.S. households: $959.4 billion (6.6 percent)
China: $1.16 trillion (8 percent)
The U.S. Treasury: $1.63 trillion (11.3 percent)
Social Security trust fund: $2.67 trillion (19 percent)
So America owes foreigners about $4.5 trillion in debt.
But America owes America $9.8 trillion. But by printing
more and more money, its worth diminshes correspondingly.
It's like drinking half a Jack Daniels bottle and then re-filling
it with a brown coke/water mixture and passing it off as the
real McCoy. It's as bad as watering down good whiskey.
Hägar
2011-07-30 15:13:31 UTC
Permalink
Top posting again, GuthBall ??? why do you do that ... never mind ...
I don't know who William Mook is, so I did a search. Three pages of self
promotion but not a single Wiki entry. 'nuff said.
Post by Brad Guth
William Mook has researched into this and having already told us what we
need to know. Otherwise, essentially the next ten generations of
Americans are the ones saddled with the first, second, third and fourth
mortgages to pay off, each with an adjustable interest rate rolled into
the next refinancing that is set by outsides like China and those
Rothschilds.
It's like trading in your old car for that new one, and the financing
always includes whatever losses or deficiencies related to your old ride.
http://groups.google.com/group/guth-usenet?hl=en
http://docs.google.com/View?id=ddsdxhv_0hrm5bdfj
http://bradguth.blogspot.com/
http://translate.google.com/#
Brad Guth, Brad_Guth, Brad.Guth, BradGuth, BG / "Guth Usenet"
Post by Hägar
... hint: It's not China
By Tom Mucha, Global Post
Truth is elusive. But it's a good thing we have math.
Our friends at Business Insider know this, and put those two principles
to work today in
this excellent and highly informative little slideshow, made even more
timely by the
ongoing talks in Washington, D.C. aimed at staving off a U.S. debt default.
Many people - politicians and pundits alike - prattle on that China and,
to a lesser extent Japan,
own most of America's $14.3 trillion in government debt.
But there's one little problem with that conventional wisdom: it's just
not true.
While the Chinese, Japanese and plenty of other foreigners own
substantial amounts,
it's really Americans who hold most of America 's debt.
Here's a quick and fascinating breakdown by total amount held and
Hong Kong: $121.9 billion (0.9 percent)
Caribbean banking centers: $148.3 (1 percent)
Taiwan: $153.4 billion (1.1 percent)
Brazil: $211.4 billion (1.5 percent)
Oil exporting countries: $229.8 billion (1.6 percent)
Mutual funds: $300.5 billion (2 percent)
Commercial banks: $301.8 billion (2.1 percent)
State, local and federal retirement funds: $320.9 billion (2.2 percent)
Money market mutual funds: $337.7 billion (2.4 percent)
United Kingdom: $346.5 billion (2.4 percent)
Private pension funds: $504.7 billion (3.5 percent)
State and local governments: $506.1 billion (3.5 percent)
Japan: $912.4 billion (6.4 percent)
U.S. households: $959.4 billion (6.6 percent)
China: $1.16 trillion (8 percent)
The U.S. Treasury: $1.63 trillion (11.3 percent)
Social Security trust fund: $2.67 trillion (19 percent)
So America owes foreigners about $4.5 trillion in debt.
But America owes America $9.8 trillion. But by printing
more and more money, its worth diminshes correspondingly.
It's like drinking half a Jack Daniels bottle and then re-filling
it with a brown coke/water mixture and passing it off as the
real McCoy. It's as bad as watering down good whiskey.
Brad Guth
2011-07-31 03:34:17 UTC
Permalink
It's just the default when I use "nntp.aioe.org", so unlike yourself I don't
bother to change what others establish.
Post by Hägar
Top posting again, GuthBall ??? why do you do that ... never mind ...
I don't know who William Mook is, so I did a search. Three pages of self
promotion but not a single Wiki entry. 'nuff said.
Hägar
2011-07-31 15:53:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brad Guth
It's just the default when I use "nntp.aioe.org", so unlike yourself I don't
bother to change what others establish.
Post by Hägar
Top posting again, GuthBall ??? why do you do that ... never mind ...
I don't know who William Mook is, so I did a search. Three pages of self
promotion but not a single Wiki entry. 'nuff said.
More power to you, lunatic.
Brad Guth
2011-08-09 01:37:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hägar
Post by Brad Guth
It's just the default when I use "nntp.aioe.org", so unlike yourself I don't
bother to change what others establish.
Post by Hägar
Top posting again, GuthBall ??? why do you do that ... never mind ...
I don't know who William Mook is, so I did a search. Three pages of self
promotion but not a single Wiki entry. 'nuff said.
More power to you, lunatic.
1. INVEST IN AMERICA’S INFRASTRUCTURE.
2. CREATE 21ST-CENTURY ENERGY JOBS.
3. INVEST IN PUBLIC EDUCATION.
4. OFFER MEDICARE FOR ALL.
5. MAKE WORK PAY.
6. SECURE SOCIAL SECURITY.
7. RETURN TO FAIRER TAX RATES.
8. END THE WARS AND INVEST AT HOME.
9. TAX WALL STREET SPECULATION.
10. STRENGTHEN DEMOCRACY.
1. INVEST IN AMERICA’S INFRASTRUCTURE. Rebuild our crumbling bridges,
dams,
levees, ports, water and sewer lines, railways, roads and public transit.
We
must invest in high-speed Internet and a modern, energy-saving electric
grid.
These investments will create good jobs and rebuild America. To help
finance
these projects, we need national and state infrastructure banks.
2. CREATE 21ST-CENTURY ENERGY JOBS. We should invest in American
businesses that
can power our country with innovative technologies like wind turbines,
solar
panels, geothermal systems, hybrid and electric cars, and next-generation
batteries. And we should put Americans to work making our homes and
buildings
energy efficient. We can create good, green jobs in America, address the
climate crisis, and build the clean energy economy.
3. INVEST IN PUBLIC EDUCATION. We should provide universal access to early
childhood education, make school funding equitable, invest in high-quality
teachers, and build safe, well-equipped school buildings for our students.
A
high-quality education system, from universal preschool to vocational
training
and affordable higher education, is critical for our future and can create
badly needed jobs now.
4. OFFER MEDICARE FOR ALL. We should expand Medicare so it’s available to
all
Americans, and reform it to provide even more cost-effective, quality
care. The
Affordable Care Act is a good start and we must implement it – but it’s
not
enough. We can save trillions of dollars by joining every other
industrialized
country – paying much less for health care while getting the same or
better
results.
5. MAKE WORK PAY. Americans have a right to fair minimum and living wages,
to
organize and collectively bargain, to enjoy equal opportunity and to earn
equal
pay for equal work. Corporate assaults on these rights bring down wages
and
benefits for all of us. They must be outlawed.
6. SECURE SOCIAL SECURITY. Keep Social Security sound, and strengthen the
retirement, disability, and survivors’ protections Americans earn through
their
hard work. Pay for it by removing the cap on the Social Security tax, so
that
upperincome people pay into Social Security on all they make, just like
the
rest of us.
7. RETURN TO FAIRER TAX RATES. End, once and for all, the Bush-era tax
giveaways
for the rich, which the rest of us – or our kids – must pay eventually.
Also,
we must outlaw corporate tax havens and tax breaks for shipping jobs
overseas.
Lastly, with millionaires and billionaires taking a growing share of our
country’s wealth, we should add new tax brackets for those making more
than $1
million each year.
8. END THE WARS AND INVEST AT HOME. Our troops have done everything that’s
been
asked of them, and it’s time to bring them home to good jobs here. We’re
sending $3 billion each week overseas that we should be investing to
rebuild
America.
9. TAX WALL STREET SPECULATION. A tiny fee of 1/20th of 1% on each Wall
Street
trade would raise tens of billions of dollars annually with little impact
on
actual investment. This would reduce speculation, “flash trading,” and
outrageous bankers’ bonuses – and we’d have a lot more money to spend on
Main
Street job creation.
10. STRENGTHEN DEMOCRACY. We need clean, fair elections – where no one’s
right
to vote can be taken away, and where money doesn’t buy you your own member
of
Congress. We must ban anonymous political influence, slam shut the
lobbyists’
revolving door in D.C. and publicly finance elections. Immigrants who want
to
join in our democracy deserve a clear path to citizenship. We must stop
giving
corporations the rights of people when it comes to our elections. And we
must
ensure our judiciary’s respect for the Constitution. Together, we will
reclaim
our democracy to get our country back on track.
--
Ezekiel 23:20
Sounds super-terrific great. So what's the excuse for not doing this on
multiple previous occasions when the GOP was in majority control and had
lots more reserve debt to start with?



How do these GOP Jesus freaks justify the mutually perpetrated cold-war?



Btw; even though our Google Groups version of Usenet/newsgroups remains
dysfunctional and no sign of recovery since July 25, at least my
"Google-Usenet" and " Guth-Usenet" accounts are still fully functional and
for the moment they are open to the public.

http://groups.google.com/group/google-usenet/topics?hl=en

http://groups.google.com/group/guth-usenet/topics?hl=en



http://groups.google.com/group/guth-usenet?hl=en

http://docs.google.com/View?id=ddsdxhv_0hrm5bdfj

http://bradguth.blogspot.com/

http://translate.google.com/#

Brad Guth, Brad_Guth, Brad.Guth, BradGuth, BG / “Guth Usenet”

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